In this hundred and second archive story by Kristian Bertel, we are learning about the Marigold flower, one of the most famous flowers in India. Read the background story of this archive photo by the photographer.
Marigolds are one of the most popular and common flowers and as portrayed above the Marigold flower is very common in India. The name 'Marigold' comes from 'Mary's gold' after Mother Mary and the name used for it in many parts if India is Genda. The word 'Genda' possibly comes from the Gonda, the tribe of Chattisgarh where the flower is cultivated. In fact, Gonda even have a legend behind the origin of the flower.
Marigolds are one of the most popular and common flowers and as portrayed above the Marigold flower is very common in India. The name 'Marigold' comes from 'Mary's gold' after Mother Mary and the name used for it in many parts if India is Genda. The word 'Genda' possibly comes from the Gonda, the tribe of Chattisgarh where the flower is cultivated. In fact, Gonda even have a legend behind the origin of the flower.

Marigold flower portraiture

Marigold flowers can be easily recognized by its bright and round orange flowers. Marigold can be found many places on the Indian subcontnent with the exception of snow areas and it can be used to craft herbal medicine and herbal medicine and these Marigold flowers can be eaten alone to replenish a small amount of hunger.

56 species of the Marigold flower
Marigolds are flowering plants of the genus Tagetes of the sunflower family Asteraceae and there are 56 species of marigolds and these flowers are native to North and South America, but some species have become naturalized around the world such as in India. Their habitats are shores, ponds, springs, quiet waters in streams, ditches, wetlands, wet meadows, waterside swamps and meadows which are prone to flooding, damp hollows in broad-leaved forests, snow-bed sites, sometimes underwater and most marigolds species are annuals although some species are perennials. As a photographer and traveler in India it is hard to ignore the flowers everywhere in India. Most species have pinnate green leaves on the stem that usually are finely cut and bracts with a leaflike structures that form a cup-shaped base below each flower head in India. Marigolds have attractive golden, orange, yellow and white flowers often with maroon highlights, where the flowers typically from four to six centimeters in diameter and are solitary or clustered.

"Flowers please the mind and grant prosperity. Hence, men with righteous deeds bestowed the name Sumana on them. According to this verse from the epic Mahabharata, when a pious man with a pure heart offers flowers to the deities, the deities become gratified and as a result bestow prosperity upon him"

Flowers play a significant role in India
Yes, flowers play a significant role in almost every religious ritual in Hinduism. Any religious ceremony, be it offering prayers or performing Aarti, is incomplete without flowers. Aarti can be simple to extravagant, but always includes flame or light. It is sometimes performed one to five times daily and usually at the end of a 'Puja' in southern India or 'Bhajan' session in northern India. It is performed during almost all Hindu ceremonies and occasions. It involves the circulating of an 'Aarti plate' or 'Aarti lamp' around a person or deity and is generally accompanied by the congregation singing songs in praise of that deva or person and many versions exist. In most versions the plate, lamp or flame represents the power of the deity. The priest circulates the plate or lamp to all those present. They cup their down-turned hands over the flame and then raise their palms to their forehead – the blessing has now been passed to the devotee. Hinduism has a long tradition of Aarti songs, simply referred to as 'Aarti', sung as an accompaniment to the ritual of aarti. It primarily eulogizes to the deity the ritual is being offered to and several sects have their own version of the common aarti songs that are often sung on chorus at various temples, during evening and morning aartis. Sometimes they also contain snippets of information on the life of the gods. Worshiping Hindu Gods and Goddesses with flower offerings is not only considered auspicious but has its own importance too. Although, any type of flower can be offered to any God yet, there are certain ones which happen to be the favorite flowers of Hindu Gods that can bring you good fortune if offered to Hindu Gods and Goddesses. All red colored flowers are dear to Lord Ganesha but the saffron yellow flower named Marigold is Lord Ganesha's favorite flower. Especially Red Genda or Red Marigold flowers are belived to please the Vinayaka greatly. This flower is special because it is the only flower of the Hindu deities that can be divided into its petals.

This flower carries meanings like:
• Despair and grief over the loss of love
• Remembering and celebrating the dead
• The beauty and warmth of the rising sun
• Winning the affections of someone through hard work
• Promoting cheer and good relations in a relationship
• Cruelty and coldness due to jealousy
• Creativity and the drive to succeed
• Sacred offerings to the Gods
• Desire for wealth

Read also:  Mumbai street child

More archive stories

India is a land full of stories. On every street, on every corner and in the many places in India, life is rushing by you as a photographer with millions of stories to be told. In the archive story above, you hopefully had a readable insight in the story that was behind the photo of an Indian an in Mumbai. On this website of Kristian Bertel | Photography you can find numerous travel pictures from the photographer. Stories and moments that tell the travel stories of how the photographer captured the specific scene that you see in the picture. The photographer's images have a story behind them, images that all are taken from around India throughout his photo journeys. The archive stories delve into Kristian's personal archive to reveal never-before-seen, including portraits and landscapes beautifully produced snapshots from various travel assignments. The archive is so-far organized into photo stories, this one included, each brought to life by narrative text and full-color photos. Together, these fascinating stories tell a story about the life in India. India, the motherland to many people around the world, a land of unforgetable travel moments. The archive takes viewers on a spectacular visual journey through some of the most stunning photographs to be found in the photographer's archive collection. The photographer culled the images to reflect the many variations on the universal theme of beauty and everyday life in India. By adding these back stories the photographer's work might immensely enhanced the understanding of the photographs.