In this hundred and thirty-eight archive story by Kristian Bertel, we learn about Radha Krishna, who are collectively known in Hinduism.
Read the background story of this archive photo by the photographer.
Radha Krishna are collectively known within Hinduism as the combined forms of feminine as well as the masculine realities of God. Krishna and Radha are the primeval forms of God and his pleasure potency, which is called 'Hladini Shakti', respectively, in several Vaishnavite schools of thought.
Radha Krishna are collectively known within Hinduism as the combined forms of feminine as well as the masculine realities of God. Krishna and Radha are the primeval forms of God and his pleasure potency, which is called 'Hladini Shakti', respectively, in several Vaishnavite schools of thought.

Radha Krishna

In Krishnaite traditions of Vaishnavism, Krishna is referred to as 'Svayam Bhagavan' and Radha is illustrated as the primeval potency of the three main potencies of God, 'Hladini', which is immense spiritual bliss, 'Sandhini', which is eternality and 'Samvit', which is existential consciousness of which Radha is an embodiment of the feeling of love towards the almighty Lord Krishna.

Why did Krishna have his flute always on him?

It was his flute's soulful tune that impressed Radha and attracted her towards him and Radha was the reason that Krishna had his flute always on him. Even though Krishna and Radha remained afar due to several circumstances, but his flute held them together. It was his flute that let out melodious tunes that enchanted everyone around.


Devotional service to the supreme lord
With Krishna, Radha is acknowledged as the 'Supreme Goddes's'. It is said that Krishna is only satiated by devotional service in loving servitude and Radha is the personification of devotional service to the supreme lord. Various devotees worship her with the understanding of her merciful nature as the only way to attain Krishna. Radha is also depicted to be Krishna himself, split into two, for the purpose of his enjoyment. As per Hindu scriptures, Radha is considered as the complete incarnation of Mahalakshmi.

I
t is believed that Krishna enchants the world, but Radha enchants even him. Therefore, she is the supreme goddess of all and together they are called as 'Radha Krishna'. In many 'Vaishnava' sections, Radha Krishna are often identified as the avatars of Lakshmi Narayan. One of the most beloved of Hindu gods, blue-skinned Krishna is the deity of love and compassion. He is frequently depicted with a flute, which he uses for its seductive powers. Krishna is the central character in the Hindu scripture 'Bhagavad Gita' as well as an avatar of Vishnu, the sustainer of the Hindu Trinity. Krishna is a major deity in Hinduism. He is worshipped as the eighth avatar of Vishnu and also as the Supreme god in his own right. He is the god of protection, compassion, tenderness and love and is one of the most popular and widely revered among Indian divinities. Krishna's birthday is celebrated every year by Hindus on Krishna Janmashtami according to the lunisolar Hindu calendar, which falls in late August or early September of the Gregorian calendar.

Different stages of Krishna's life
The anecdotes and narratives of Krishna's life are generally titled as 'Krishna Leela'. He is a central character in the 'Mahabharata', the 'Bhagavata Purana', the 'Brahma Vaivarta Purana' and the 'Bhagavad Gita' and is mentioned in many Hindu philosophical, theological and mythological texts. They portray him in various perspectives, as a god-child, a prankster, a model lover, a divine hero and the universal supreme being. His iconography reflects these legends and shows him in different stages of his life, such as an infant eating butter, a young boy playing a flute, a young boy with Radha or surrounded by female devotees or a friendly charioteer giving counsel to Arjuna.




"The name 'Krishna' is word which is primarily an adjective meaning 'Black', 'Dark', 'Dark blue' or 'The all attractive'. The waning moon is called 'Krishna Paksha', relating to the adjective meaning 'Darkening' and the name is also interpreted sometimes as all-attractive"




The essence and symbol of divine love
Across the various theologies and philosophies, the common theme presents Krishna as the essence and symbol of divine love, with human life and love as a reflection of the divine. The longing and love-filled legends of Krishna and the gopis, his playful pranks as a baby, as well as his later dialogues with other characters, are philosophically treated as metaphors for the human longing for the divine and for meaning and the play between the universals and the human soul. Krishna's lila is a theology of love-play. Love is presented not simply as a means to salvation, it is the highest life. Human love is God's love. Other texts that include Krishna such as the 'Bhagavad Gita' have attracted numerous 'Bhasya', which are commentaries in the Hindu traditions. Though only a part of the Hindu epic 'Mahabharata', it has functioned as an independent spiritual guide. It allegorically raises through Krishna and Arjuna the ethical and moral dilemmas of human life, then presents a spectrum of answers, weighing in on the ideological questions on human freedoms, choices and responsibilities towards self and towards others. This Krishna dialogue has attracted numerous interpretations, from being a metaphor of inner human struggle teaching non-violence, to being a metaphor of outer human struggle teaching a rejection of quietism to persecution.

What is the relationship between Radha and Krishna?
Radha's connection to Krishna is of two types, 'Svakiya-rasa', which means a married relationship and 'Parakiya-rasa', which means a relationship signified with eternal mental love. The 'Gaudiya' tradition focuses upon 'Parakiya-rasa' as the highest form of love, wherein Radha and Krishna share thoughts even through separation.

Why did Krishna not marry Radha?
According to another belief, Radha represented 'Jeevatma' while Shri Krishna is the 'Paramatma'. Radha's selfless love was the highest form of devotion and therefore, she merged into Shri Krishna by surrendering herself. Hence, since she had united with him, there arose no need for marriage.

Why Radha is special to Krishna?
It is believed that Krishna enchants the world, but Radha enchants even him. Therefore, she is the supreme goddess of all and together they are called as 'Radha Krishna'.

Read also:  Garments of India




Read also:  Garments of India

More archive stories

India is a land full of stories. On every street, on every corner and in the many places in India, life is rushing by you as a photographer with millions of stories to be told. In the archive story above, you hopefully had a readable insight in the story that was behind the photo of Radha Krishna in Rajasthan. On this website of Kristian Bertel | Photography you can find numerous travel pictures from the photographer. Stories and moments that tell the travel stories of how the photographer captured the specific scene that you see in the picture. The photographer's images have a story behind them, images that all are taken from around India throughout his photo journeys. The archive stories delve into Kristian's personal archive to reveal never-before-seen, including portraits and landscapes beautifully produced snapshots from various travel assignments. The archive is so-far organized into photo stories, this one included, each brought to life by narrative text and full-color photos. Together, these fascinating stories tell a story about the life in India. India, the motherland to many people around the world, a land of unforgetable travel moments. The archive takes viewers on a spectacular visual journey through some of the most stunning photographs to be found in the photographer's archive collection. The photographer culled the images to reflect the many variations on the universal theme of beauty and everyday life in India. By adding these back stories the photographer's work might immensely enhanced the understanding of the photographs.