In this twelfth archive story by Kristian Bertel, the photographer captured a colorful scene at a ghat in Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, India. Read the background story of this archive photo by the photographer.
Devoted Hindus are gathered at the Rana Mahal Ghat in Varanasi, India a late afternoon. This ghat is located south of Dasaswamedh Ghat, between Darbhanga Ghat and Chousaiti Ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi. As you can see in this photograph ghats are embankments made in steps of stone slabs along the river bank where pilgrims perform ritual ablutions.
Devoted Hindus are gathered at the Rana Mahal Ghat in Varanasi, India a late afternoon. This ghat is located south of Dasaswamedh Ghat, between Darbhanga Ghat and Chousaiti Ghat along the Ganges in Varanasi. As you can see in this photograph ghats are embankments made in steps of stone slabs along the river bank where pilgrims perform ritual ablutions.

Rana Mahal Ghat in Varanasi

Ghats in Varanasi are an integral complement to the concept of divinity represented in physical, metaphysical and supernatural elements. Hindus believe in brahman and will ultimately return to it. Hindus believe that earthly life is cyclical, you are born again and again and the quality of these rebirths being dependent upon your karma in previous lives.

Riverfront steps to the Ganges
Ghats in Varanasi are riverfront steps leading to the banks of the River Ganges. The city has eightyseven ghats. Most of the ghats are bathing and puja ceremony ghats, while a few are used exclusively as cremation sites. Most Varanasi ghats were built after 1700 AD, when the city was part of Maratha Empire. The patrons of current ghats are Marathas, Shindes also spelled Scindias, Holkars, Bhonsles, and Peshwes also spelled Peshwas. Many ghats are associated with legends or mythologies while many ghats are privately owned. Morning boat ride on the Ganges across the ghats is a popular visitors attraction. In Hindu traditions, cremation is one of the rites of passage and the ghats of Varanasi are considered one of the auspicious locations for this ritual. At the time of the cremation or last rites, a 'Puja' which is a prayer is performed. Hymns and mantras are recited during cremation to mark the ritual. The Manikarnika and Harishchandra Ghats are dedicated to the cremation ritual. Annually, less than 2 in 1000 people who die in India, or 25,000 to 30,000 bodies are cremated on various Varanasi Ghats, about an average of eighty per day. This practice has become controversial for the pollution it causes to the river. In the 1980s, the government of India funded a clean Ganges initiative, to address cremation and other sources of pollution along the ghats of Varanasi. In many cases, the cremation is done elsewhere and only the ashes are dispersed into the river near these ghats.

Rana Mahal, once a majestic ghat
The Rana Mahal Ghat is located south of Dasaswamedh Ghat, between Darbhanga Ghat and Chousaiti Ghat. It is marked with red stone walls and stepped embankments on the banks of Ganga. The ghat was reconstructed in seventeenth century by the ruler of Udaipur named Rana Jagat Singh. The magnificent palace, an excellent example of Rajasthani architecture stands tall on the ghat. The ghat was also included amongst seven prominent ghats under 'Revitalisation of Varanasi' project launched by regional tourism department for renovation and resurrection. But when the photographed visited the Rana Mahal Ghat he experienced a poor condition of the ghat. Broken steps, remains of debris and poor sanitary conditions could leave you stunned as he walked from the Dasaswamedh Ghat towards the south in quest of majestic Rajasthani architecture, prominently reflected in the building or palace along the Rana Mahal Ghat. The ghat, depicting the grandeur and glory of Rajasthan rulers, seems to be a shadow of itself, as reflected when it was once built. "- Though, the devout and visitors frequently throng the ghat due to its historical significance and location of temples, a dip at the ghat becomes a troublesome experience due to rupturing of stepped embankments. A place wehere youngsters and children are learning to swim from the broken steps in the evening," the photographer says.

More archive stories

India is a land full of stories. On every street, on every corner and in the many places in India, life is rushing by you as a photographer with millions of stories to be told. In the archive story above, you hopefully had a readable insight in the story that was behind the photo of a ghat in Varanasi. On this website of Kristian Bertel | Photography you can find numerous travel pictures from the photographer. Stories and moments that tell the travel stories of how the photographer captured the specific scene that you see in the picture. The photographer's images have a story behind them, images that all are taken from around India throughout his photo journeys. The archive stories delve into Kristian's personal archive to reveal never-before-seen, including portraits and landscapes beautifully produced snapshots from various travel assignments. The archive is so-far organized into photo stories, this one included, each brought to life by narrative text and full-color photos. Together, these fascinating stories tell a story about the life in India. India, the motherland to many people around the world, a land of unforgetable travel moments. The archive takes viewers on a spectacular visual journey through some of the most stunning photographs to be found in the photographer's archive collection. The photographer culled the images to reflect the many variations on the universal theme of beauty and everyday life in India. By adding these back stories the photographer's work might immensely enhanced the understanding of the photographs.