In this sixty-ninth archive story by Kristian Bertel, we see the Sun go down over Jodhpur in Rajasthan, India.
Read the background story of this archive photo by the photographer.
The Sun, as the source of energy and light for life on earth has been a central object in culture and religion since prehistory. Ritual solar worship has given rise to solar deities in theistic traditions not only in India, but also throughout the world, and solar symbolism is ubiquitous. Apart from its immediate connection to light and warmth, the Sun is also important in timekeeping as the main indicator of the day and the year as in this photograph depicted in Jodhpur, India.
The Sun, as the source of energy and light for life on earth has been a central object in culture and religion since prehistory. Ritual solar worship has given rise to solar deities in theistic traditions not only in India, but also throughout the world, and solar symbolism is ubiquitous. Apart from its immediate connection to light and warmth, the Sun is also important in timekeeping as the main indicator of the day and the year as in this photograph depicted in Jodhpur, India.

Sun over Jodhpur, India

It is not without reason that Jodhpur is called the 'Sun city' because the weather remains bright and sunny all around the year and to keep the houses cool blue colour is used on the houses. The earliest understanding of the Sun was that of a disk in the sky, whose presence above the horizon creates day and whose absence causes night. In the Bronze Age, this understanding was modified by assuming that the Sun is transported across the sky in a boat or a chariot and transported back to the place of sunrise during the night passing through the underworld. The Sun is roughly middle-aged and it has not changed dramatically for more than four billion years and will remain fairly stable for more than another five billion years. It currently fuses about 600 million tons of hydrogen into helium every second.

History and symbolism of the sun
The Sun's development suggest that three point eight to two point five billion years ago, the Sun was only about seventy percent as bright as it is today. Such a weak star would not have been able to sustain liquid water on Earth's surface in India and thus life should not have been able to develop. However, the geological record demonstrates that Earth has remained at a fairly constant temperature throughout its history, and that the young Earth was somewhat warmer than it is today. The sun god in Hinduism is an ancient and revered deity. In later Hindu usage, all the Vedic Adityas lost identity and metamorphosed into one composite deity, Surya, the Sun. The attributes of all other Adityas merged into that of Surya and the names of all other Adityas became synonymous with, or epithets of, Surya. The Ramayana has Rama as a descendant of the Surya, thus belonging to the Suryavansha or the clan of the Sun. The Mahabharata describes one of its warrior heroes, Karna, as being the son of the Pandava mother Kunti and Surya. The sun god is said to be married to the goddess Ranaadeh, also known as Sanjnya. She is depicted in dual form, being both sunlight and shadow, personified. The goddess is revered in Gujarat and Rajasthan.

The Aravalli Range in India
As a photographer and traveler in India it is easy to be amazed of the country's landscape. The hills that one can see in the above photograph is amoung the mountains in the Aravalli Range. A range of mountains running around seven hundred kilometers in a southwest direction, starting in North India from Delhi and passing through southern Haryana, through to Western India across the states of Rajasthan and ending in Gujarat. The climate of Jodhpur is hot and semi-arid during its nearly yearlong dry season, but contains a brief rainy season from late June to September. Although the average rainfall is around fourhundred fifty millimetres, it fluctuates greatly. In the famine year over hundred years ago, Jodhpur received only twenty four millimeters, but in the flood year some years later it received as much as over one thousand millimeters. Temperatures are extreme from March to October, except when the monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed forty degrees. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises, which adds to the perception of the heat. The highest temperature recorded in Jodhpur was tow years ago when it rose up to fifty-three point two degrees.

Jodhpur is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan and officially the second metropolitan city of the state. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name. The capital of the kingdom was known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert. A princely state, also called native state, legally, under the British or Indian state for those states on the subcontinent, was a vassal state under a local or regional ruler in a subsidiary alliance with the British Raj. Though the history of the princely states of the subcontinent dates from at least the classical period of Indian history, the predominant usage of the term princely state specifically refers to a semi-sovereign principality on the Indian subcontinent during the British Raj that was not directly governed by the British, but rather by a local ruler.

More archive stories

India is a land full of stories. On every street, on every corner and in the many places in India, life is rushing by you as a photographer with millions of stories to be told. In the archive story above, you hopefully had a readable insight in the story that was behind the photo of a sunset in Jodhpur. On this website of Kristian Bertel | Photography you can find numerous travel pictures from the photographer. Stories and moments that tell the travel stories of how the photographer captured the specific scene that you see in the picture. The photographer's images have a story behind them, images that all are taken from around India throughout his photo journeys. The archive stories delve into Kristian's personal archive to reveal never-before-seen, including portraits and landscapes beautifully produced snapshots from various travel assignments. The archive is so-far organized into photo stories, this one included, each brought to life by narrative text and full-color photos. Together, these fascinating stories tell a story about the life in India. India, the motherland to many people around the world, a land of unforgetable travel moments. The archive takes viewers on a spectacular visual journey through some of the most stunning photographs to be found in the photographer's archive collection. The photographer culled the images to reflect the many variations on the universal theme of beauty and everyday life in India. By adding these back stories the photographer's work might immensely enhanced the understanding of the photographs.