In this fourty-fifth archive story by Kristian Bertel, we portray an Indian youngster at a road in Mumbai, Maharashtra in India.
Read the background story of this archive photo by the photographer.
The youngster portrait was taken at the Carnac Rd just near the Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Mandai, formerly Crawford Market in Mumbai, which is one of South Mumbai's most famous markets. When the photographer is taking portrait in India he tends to focus on the subject's eyes and personality, as a photo that captures the essence of a subject's expression.
The youngster portrait was taken at the Carnac Rd just near the Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Mandai, formerly Crawford Market in Mumbai, which is one of South Mumbai's most famous markets. When the photographer is taking portrait in India he tends to focus on the subject's eyes and personality, as a photo that captures the essence of a subject's expression.

Youngster at Mumbai Rd portraiture

Above is a photo by the portrait photographer Kristian Bertel. He does not have a studio, background, lights and equipment as a lot of folks with more technical skill. Yet those folks may not be portrait photographers as Kristian. What is the difference? He cares about people and is genuinely curious about people he has never met and can connect with them in just a few minutes.

Taking portraits of a subject
After a one-hour session, he knows more about his average subject's life than many others. Film costs, so he does not limit himself to two exposures per subject. Yet his photo of the youngster above is one of the only pictures of this youngster he took a portrait of. "- My advice to digital photographers is to fill the flash card with at least 50 images in hopes of yielding one that captures the essence of a subject's expression
. The artistic success implies that the most important thing about portrait photography is an interest in your subject. If you are so busy working that you cannot care about strangers, do not take their photos. Or at rate, do not expect those photos to be good. Some of my better portraits were taken on a trip to India because I had the time in which to be alone and learn to appreciate the value of a stranger's company and conversation", the photographer says. He suggests that if you do not have or cannot create a photo studio, concentrate on environmental portraiture as the portait in Mumbai. Show the subject and also his surroundings. These tend to work best if you can enlarge the final image so the subjects eyes can be seen clearly. In any smaller photo, the subject's face is simply too small. Taking photos that will enlarge well is a whole art by itself. Your allies in this endeavor will be a low ISO setting, prime rather than zoom lenses, a tripod, and at least a mid-range digital SLR.

There are two elements to a photo studio for portrait photography. One is a controlled background. You want to focus attention on your subject and avoid distracting elements in the frame. Probably the best portraits are not taken against a gray seamless paper roll. On the other hand, you are unlikely to screw up and leave something distracting in the frame if you confine yourself to using seamless paper or other monochromatic backgrounds. You do not have to build a special room to have a controlled background. There are all kinds of clever portable backdrops and backdrop supports that you can buy or build. If you absolutely cannot control the background, the standard way to cheat is to use a long fast lens, for instance, 300/2.8. Fast telephoto lenses have very little depth of field. Your subject's eyes and nose will be sharp. Everything else that might have been distracting will be blurred into blobs of color.

Portrait photography at the Crawford Market in India
One can buy a variety of things in and around Crawford Market, where the portrait was taken of the youngster. Some of the things that you can buy at the market are ready-to-stitch clothes, dress material, Chinese toys, party products, artificial jewellery, travel bags, fruits and vegetables, shoes, belts and cake making and decorating equipment and toiletries. The youngster portrait was taken at the Carnac Rd just near the Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Mandai, formerly Crawford Market, which is one of South Mumbai's most famous markets in India. It was earlier named after Arthur Crawford, the first Municipal Commissioner of the city. The market was later named after Mahatma Jotirao Phule after a long struggle by the President of Mahatma Phule Smarak Samiti, Mukundraoji Bhujbal Patil. The market is situated just north of Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station and west of the J.J. flyover at a busy intersection. The market houses a wholesale fruit, vegetable and poultry market. One end of the market is a pet store. Different varieties of dogs, cats, and birds can be found in this area. Also, endangered species are illegally sold there. Most of the sellers inside the market sell imported items such as foods, cosmetics, household and gift items. It was the main wholesale market for fruits in Mumbai until March 1996, when the wholesale traders were relocated to Navi Mumbai, known as the New Bombay.
The building, completed in 1869, was donated to the city by Cowasji Jehangir. After India's independence, the market was renamed after Maharashtrian social reformer, Mahatma Jyotirao Phule. In 1882, the building was the first in India to be lit up by electricity.

More archive stories

India is a land full of stories. On every street, on every corner and in the many places in India, life is rushing by you as a photographer with millions of stories to be told. In the archive story above, you hopefully had a readable insight in the story that was behind the photo of an Indian youngster in Mumbai. On this website of Kristian Bertel | Photography you can find numerous travel pictures from the photographer. Stories and moments that tell the travel stories of how the photographer captured the specific scene that you see in the picture. The photographer's images have a story behind them, images that all are taken from around India throughout his photo journeys. The archive stories delve into Kristian's personal archive to reveal never-before-seen, including portraits and landscapes beautifully produced snapshots from various travel assignments. The archive is so-far organized into photo stories, this one included, each brought to life by narrative text and full-color photos. Together, these fascinating stories tell a story about the life in India. India, the motherland to many people around the world, a land of unforgetable travel moments. The archive takes viewers on a spectacular visual journey through some of the most stunning photographs to be found in the photographer's archive collection. The photographer culled the images to reflect the many variations on the universal theme of beauty and everyday life in India. By adding these back stories the photographer's work might immensely enhanced the understanding of the photographs.